S.E.A. Schedules (general guide to a child's daily schedule)

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S.E.A. Schedules (general guide to a child's daily schedule)

52.00

Figuring out a daily routine for your baby is no easy thing. How can you fit in all those feedings, naps, and diaper changes and still make it out of the house? How much should your baby be sleeping, eating and having activity — and when should this happen? How do other parents manage to shower, make meals, and spend time with their partner?

To get the answers to these questions and more, we asked parents of babies of all ages to share their daily schedules: the whole deal, hour by hour, from sunup to bedtime and the middle-of-the-night wake-ups that can come afterward. We also had pediatricians weigh in with age-by-age guidance on feeding, sleep, and activities. This is how we were able to put together our S.E.A. schedules. 

S.E.A. schedules can help you to keep track of your child's daily schedule of Sleep (S) Eating (E) and Activity (A) = S.E.A. schedules :)

They take you from newborn all the way through to 3+ years of age. These forms have been designed to accommodate families with a singleton and families with twins.

For your convenience we have put them in a Microsoft Excel format. We suggest one way of utilizing them is to find the one that closely match your child's current schedule/age group. Print out a sheet for everyday. You and all caregivers then can track your child's overall daily schedule. This way you will be able to better care for your twins when everyone is filling in the charts. This too can help to see if there are any patterns and /or if you should move onto the next schedule.

Simply click on the purchase tab and once you have paid you will be instructed on how to download your schedules to get you started. 

 

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Terms and conditions

These are to be used as a general guide to a child's daily schedule and not to followed exact.

Note to recipient(s)

The S.E.A. schedules are only intended as advise and informational purposes and should not be considered medical advice, diagnostics or treatment recommendations.