Longest CrocK Pot Chic Toc

This chicken taco recipe is one of my children's favorite meals and the longest to make! It's the longest slow cooker dish because you get distracted and then dump all the ingredients in, turn it on and come back to the best tasting meal! Lots of prep, tons of distractions, freezes well and the kids love it!

If you have time this dish goes well with rice, tortilla chips, sprinkle on some cheddar cheese, or spice it up with some jalapeno peppers.


PREP TIME: 2+ hours

TOTAL TIME: 16+ hours

The longest slow cooker dish because you get distracted and then dump all the ingredients in, turn it on and come back to the best tasting meal!

INGREDIENTS:

1 small onion, chopped
1 can black beans, drained
1 can kidney beans, drained
1 can tomato sauce
10 oz package frozen corn kernels
2 cans diced tomatoes w/chilies (You do not have this. You use crushed tomatoes instead)
1 half eaten large carrot and yellow pepper that the kids did not finish from yesterday
1 tbsp each of cumin, chili powder, garlic powder, paprika, salt, oregano
4 boneless skinless chicken breasts


DISTRACTIONS: Sprinkle these throughout the entire preparation process.

  • It's summer break and the kids are home running around getting drinks and snacks, so you have to get out of their way each time they enter the kitchen.
  • Remember that you need to pay bills. You get the bills and put them next to computer. This is when you notice that you have new email and you spend the next 5 minutes reading your email and the next 20 minutes looking at Facebook.
  • Remember that you need to ask a client a question and make a note. 
  • Children enter kitchen and tell you that they are hungry. Stop everything and make them chicken noodle soup. Wait for it to boil. Poor the soup into two large mugs and add a few cubs of ice to it because it is too hot. Give to children to eat. Children taste the soup and yell loudly that the soup is too hot and demand ice. You apologize, try to explain that you did add ice. They continue to insist that it is still too hot and get their own cubes of ice.
  • Doorbell rings, go to the closet to put on a sweater because you are still in your pajamas. Open the door to see the UPS person getting back into truck and driving away. Open the box that was delivered and find the new pop screen for your microphone. Take the next 5 minutes to read the instructions and then the next 30 minutes to install said mic. Give up because you can't understand the directions.
  • Husband is getting ready for work. He takes a moment (45 minutes) to catch-up with you before leaving. You give him a kiss and hug, then tell him to kick-butt before he leaves. (Sweet!)
  • As you are cutting the onion the kids are back to tell on each other. Now you are sniffling, wiping your eyes on your shoulder, somehow get juice form the onion in your eye, turn on the water in the kitchen sink, try washing your hands, wipe you very runny nose on your shirt, grab a paper towel, wet the paper towel, press the cool wet paper towel to juicy onion-eye, wiping nose on shirt again and again. Mind you this whole time the kids have been yelling at each other and at you to do something. Through burning, teary eyes and a nose that will not stop, you tell them both to, "STOP". One marches off to their room the other slinks down in the kitchen chair. After tending to your eye and nose you sit with the child in the kitchen and listen to what they have to say. You say something like, "I can see why you were frustrated. Why don't you use your calm words next time you are frustrated." We then rehearse what those words could be. You go to the other child and sit on their bed while you find out their side of the story. You repeat what you did with the first child. Then you have the children come together to workout their differences. They each smile and make plans for the fort that they are going to build, as they run to the basement. You go back to chopping the onion.
  • You are drinking a lot of water so you are having to make a lot of bathroom breaks. On one of your trips to the bathroom you notice that there are clothes on the floor, in one of your child's room. You go in and pick up the clothes and put them in the hamper. While you are there you notice the bed is unmade. You make the bed. You notice an empty cup. You put the empty cup in the sink. You then go into your other child's room to check on their room as well. Same things need to be done to that room. You go back to the kitchen and continue to chop the carrot. Half way through you remember that you never went to the bathroom. You go to the bathroom.
  • Please feel free to add any distraction that is personal to you.

DIRECTIONS:

Combine beans, onion, chili peppers, corn, carrot, yellow pepper, tomato sauce, crushed tomatoes or diced tomato, cumin, chili powder and the rest of the seasonings in a slow cooker and mix well.
Add the chicken in,completely cover and cook on LOW for 8 to 10 hours or on HIGH for 4 to 6 hours.
Half hour before serving, remove chicken and shred.
Return chicken to slow cooker and stir in.
Top with your favorite toppings!

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Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

Daylight Saving Time (Fall Back)

The dreaded Daylight Saving Time is just around the corner.

I get many calls around this time every year from parents asking me how to prepare their children for this big shift to their child’s schedule.

What is Daylight Savings?

Daylight Saving Time (DST) is the practice of setting the clocks forward one hour from Standard Time during the summer months, and back again in the fall, in order to make better use of natural daylight.

This fall, it happens to end at 2:00 AM on Sunday, November 1st, 2015.

Before you go to bed on Saturday night, remember to “fall back” by setting your clocks back one hour. (The exceptions to DST are Arizona, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, and American Samoa - source: The Old Farmer's Almanac.)

What Effects will Daylight Savings have on Children?

Newborn babies are usually not effected by the start or finish of Daylight Saving. However older babies and toddlers can be for a week or two and you may have an overtired little one on your hands as a result.

Rather than deal with the effects of daylight savings on Sunday and the following week or two, it is better to prepare your little one a few days before the big shift in their schedule.

How Parents Can Help

Transition at the start and finish of daylight saving is far easier if your baby is in a routine. If your baby or toddler isn't in a routine, there is still time to get organized. At the very least have a consistent bedtime for the next few days, so you can follow the advice below.

If you would like to establish your baby or toddler in a routine before the start of Daylight Savings, contact us for information. We recommend the routine that is provided to you on our Member’s Only page.

Adjusting to the End of Daylight Saving Time

Although adults and older children can usually quickly adapt to a new wake up and sleep time, especially if they are already a little sleep deprived, it can be more difficult for younger children.

After moving the clocks back an hour, children who were used to going to bed 7pm are likely to be ready to go to bed at 6 pm. While that may be okay, they may then be likely to wake up at 6am – which may not be OK!!

Be proactive and prepare for the clocks going back. This should minimize the interference to your baby's sleep and help them adjust much quicker.

Try and adjust the schedule from the first feed of the day by 15 mins each day (see below). If your baby can't last first thing in the morning, just try to make the routine adjustments as the day goes on. To know what is a good overall schedule look like, check out our S.E.A Schedules.

Instructions

Assuming a 7pm Bedtime:


Day / Routine During the Day Bedtime

Wednesday / Usual Sleep and Feed times / 7:00PM

Thursday / Sleep and Feed times 15mins later, (e.g. first feed at 7:15am not 7am) / 7:15pm

Friday / Sleep and Feed times 30mins later (e.g. first feed at 7:45am not 7am) / 7:30pm

Saturday / Sleep and Feed times 45mins later (e.g. first feed at 7:45am not 7am) / 7:45pm

Sunday / Wake your child at 7am, then your usual routine times / 7:00pm (new time)


Keep in Mind

While your little one is getting used to the new time, stick to your usual bedtime rules and behaviors. For example if your toddler usually can go to sleep by himself, avoid lying down with him or letting him sleep in your bed. A week of different bedtime routine while adjusting to Daylight Saving could be long enough to build a new habit, which you then need to deal with.

If your baby or toddler wants to sleep in a bit later (after you start adjusting their bedtime, then allow this.

Bonus: When you set your clock back by one hour on Saturday night before you go to bed, be sure to check your smoke alarms at the same times. :)

 

 

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Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

Parents can train newborns to adapt to family's sleep rhythm

Newsday

Updated September 22, 2015 12:50 PM
By BETH WHITEHOUSE  beth.whitehouse@newsday.com 

Q. What can a parent do when a newborn has her days and nights mixed up, sleeping all day and then staying awake for too long during the night?

A. In utero, baby slept at will. "Nobody told her she was supposed to be awake by day and sleep at night," says Dr. Ronald Marino, associate chairman of pediatrics at Winthrop University Hospital in Mineola. "It's the parents' job to socialize the baby to join our world."

Marino and Rebecca Kammerer, a pediatric sleep coach who owns Sleep Cadets in Mineola, agree on these strategies:

* During the day, wake baby every two to three hours. "There are ways to go about that gently," Kammerer says. Unswaddle baby, letting cool air touch her skin. Take off her clothing; change her diaper.

* If she's still not awake, pat the bottom of her feet with little slaps, or rub her back firmly, almost like scratching without using your fingernails, Marino suggests.

* Give her lots of stimulation. "Sing to her, read to her," Kammerer suggests. Make sure she's exposed to natural light. Pull shades open in the house, or take the baby outside for a walk.

* When baby wakes at night, don't indulge her in play, Marino says. "Don't turn the light on; night is boring time. Don't talk to her, don't try to get her engaged with the family."

The situation will resolve. "Slowly you get the baby to join the family's rhythm instead of the family joining the baby's rhythm," Marino says. Adds Kammerer: "If you are mindful and you really start applying these strategies, it will happen more quickly."

Source: Newsday

Click here to read the Full Article: http://www.newsday.com/lifestyle/family/how-to-train-newborns-to-adapt-to-family-s-sleep-rhythm-1.10859637?pts=141082

Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

Self-Regulation

Self-Regulation

Helping your baby learn to self-regulate, also known as self-soothing, is one the most important gifts that you can give to your child. It will help your child learn tools in calming them self, through the rest of their life.

/Source
Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

When it's still light out at bedtime

When it's still light out at bedtime

Updated June 16, 2015 10:46 AM
By BETH WHITEHOUSE  beth.whitehouse@newsday.com 

 

Q. I'm trying to keep my 4-year-old on a 7:30 p.m. bedtime, but she keeps telling me it's daytime because it isn't dark out yet. Any tips on helping her stick to her 7:30 bedtime?

 

A. First, make sure her bedroom is optimally set for sleep, says Rebecca Kammerer, a pediatric sleep coach who owns Sleep Cadets in Mineola. Invest in blackout shades or blackout curtains so the bedroom is dark even if it is light outside. Add a night light -- Kammerer recommends using a red bulb for soothing light -- so you can maneuver in her room in the dark and so she won't be afraid of the darkness. You might also add a sound machine so she hears and feels the hum of white noise -- even a box fan would do the trick, Kammerer says.

Then, when it's time to go to sleep but she tells you it's still light outside, explain to her that the time she goes to bed stays the same in every season, so that she wakes up feeling rested and happy. To get her to the bedroom, say this: "We're not going to go to sleep yet, but we're going to get ready," Kammerer suggests. Then, go through your nighttime routine of putting on pajamas and brushing teeth. "She wants to stay up to be with you," Kammerer says. So go with her into her dark bedroom, read her a story or two and sing to her. This gives her the cue that it's bedtime, and the dark room will reinforce it.

http://www.newsday.com/lifestyle/family/tips-for-when-it-s-still-light-out-at-kids-bedtime-1.10511891?pts=404975

Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

How to Build a Secure Attachment Bond with Your Baby

Parenting Tips for Creating a Strong Attachment Relationship

The secure attachment bond is the nonverbal emotional relationship between an infant and primary caregiver, defined by emotional responses to the baby's cues, as expressed through movements, gestures, and sounds. The success of this wordless relationship enables a child to feel secure enough to develop fully, and affects how he or she will interact, communicate, and form relationships throughout life. By understanding how you can better participate in this emotional interaction, you can ensure that your child has the best foundation for life.

What is the attachment bond?

The attachment bond is the unique emotional relationship between your baby and you as his or her primary caretaker. This wordless interactive emotional exchange draws the two of you together, ensuring that your infant will feel safe and be calm enough to experience optimal development of their nervous system. The attachment bond is a key factor in the way your infant's brain organizes itself and influences your child’s social, emotional, intellectual, and physical development.

The quality of the attachment bond varies. A secure bond provides your baby with an optimal foundation for life: eagerness to learn, healthy self-awareness, trust, and consideration for others. An insecure attachment bond, one that fails to meet your infant’s need for safety and understanding, can lead to confusion about his or her own identity and difficulties in learning and relating to others in later life.

Myths and facts about baby bonding and secure attachment

Myth: “My baby is attached to me because I gave birth to him or her.”

  • Fact: Infants have independent nervous systems that may be different from yours. What makes you feel good may not be the same thing that makes your infant feel good. So unless you look and listen to your infant’s emotional cues, you won’t understand his or her individual needs.

Myth: “Secure attachment and love are the same thing.”

  • Fact: Bonding and attachment happen instinctively between mothers and babies, but, unfortunately, loving your baby doesn't automatically result in secure attachment. Secure attachment develops from your ability to manage your stress, respond to your baby's cues, and successfully soothe your infant.

Myth: “I am having a hard time reading my baby’s signs or nonverbal cues and I can’talways figure out what my baby wants, so he or she must not be securely attached.”

  • Fact: It is not possible or necessary to understand your baby’s emotional needs all the time in order to develop a secure attachment bond. As long as you recognize the disconnect and attempt a repair, the relationship will stay strong and may even grow stronger as a result of repairing the disconnect.

Myth: “Always responding to their needs makes babies spoiled.”

  • Fact: On the contrary, the more responsive you are to an infant’s needs, the less “spoiled” the baby will be as they get older. Bonding creates trust, and children with secure attachments tend to be more independent, not less.

Myth: “Babies can have a secure attachment bond with more than one person.”

  • Fact: Babies form a secure attachment with only one person – the person who spends the most time caring for them. However, they can bond or connect in a loving way with all those people who take care of them.

Myth: “Secure attachment is a one-way process that focuses on accurately reading my baby's cues.”

  • Fact: Attachment is a two–way, interactive process where your baby reads your cues as you read his or hers.

Why is a secure attachment bond important?

The attachment process is interactive and dynamic. Both you and your baby participate in an exchange of nonverbal emotional cues that make your baby feel understood and safe. Even in the first days of life, your baby picks up on your emotional cues—your tone of voice, your gestures, and your emotions—and sends you signals by crying, cooing, mimicking facial expressions, and eventually smiling, laughing, pointing, and even yelling, too. In return, you watch and listen to your baby’s cries and sounds, and respond to their cues, at the same time as you tend to their need for food, warmth, and affection. Secure attachment grows out of the success of this nonverbal communication process between you and your baby.

Why a secure attachment bond is important to your baby

A secure attachment bond teaches your baby to trust you, to communicate their feelings to you, and eventually to trust others as well. As you and your baby connect with one another, your baby learns how to have a healthy sense of self and how to be in a loving, empathetic relationship.

Secure attachment causes the parts of your baby’s brain responsible for social and emotional development, communication, and relationships to grow and develop in the best way possible. This relationship becomes the foundation of your child’s ability to connect with others in a healthy way. Qualities that you may take for granted in adult relationships—like empathy, understanding, love, and the ability to be responsive to others—are first learned in infancy.

When babies develop a secure attachment bond, they are better able to:

  • Develop fulfilling intimate relationships
  • Maintain emotional balance
  • Feel confident and good about themselves
  • Enjoy being with others
  • Rebound from disappointment and loss
  • Share their feelings and seek support

A secure attachment bond is good for you, too

Nature has programmed mothers as well as their infants to have a “falling in love” experience through attachment. The joy you experience as you connect with your infant goes a long way to relieve fatigue from lack of sleep and the stress of learning how to care for your baby. The bonding process releases endorphins in your body that motivate you, give you energy, and make you feel happy. Creating a secure attachment with your infant may take a little effort, but the rewards are huge for both of you.

A secure attachment bond with your baby starts with taking care of yourself

Babies communicate most effectively when they are in a quiet and alert state, and so do you. As hard as it may be, it is important to take care of yourself in order to build a secure attachment bond with your infant.

  • Try to get enough sleep. Sleep deprivation can make you cranky, listless, and irritable. Some parents have found it helpful to trade night duty (on for two nights, off for two nights), or to have at least one morning a week to sleep late.
  • Ask for support around the house. Especially in the newborn stages, get as much help as you can from your spouse, family, or friends.
  • Schedule some time away. Caring for a young infant is demanding, and taking some time away can help you parent more effectively. An hour in a coffee shop, a walk, a yoga class, or doing something you want to do can provide some perspective and renewed energy.

Finding ways to calm yourself in stressful times

Since babies can't communicate verbally, they are especially attuned to signs of anxiety or stress. Babies need outside help to calm down. But an anxious caregiver can actually add to the baby's stress, making him or her harder to soothe. If possible, when you are feeling stressed, try to find ways to calm down before you interact with your baby.

  • Take a deep breath. This may mean letting your baby cry a minute longer so that you can take a deep breath before picking your baby up and trying to soothe him or her.
  • Team up. Don’t think you have to do it all yourself. Try to enlist the help of your spouse, friends, family members, or a babysitter to help hold or care for your baby during fussy times of the day.
  • Take a walk. Fresh air and a change of scenery can do wonders for you and your baby. During particularly stressful times, try making a change in environment and see if it helps you and your baby calm down.

Parenting tips for creating a secure attachment bond

Secure attachment doesn’t happen overnight. It is an ongoing partnership between you and your baby. As time goes on, it will become easier to understand the cries, interpret the signals, and respond to your baby’s needs for food, rest, love, and comfort—try to be patient with yourself and your baby as you learn about each other.

Secure attachment bond tip #1: Learn to understand your baby’s unique cues

As parents of multiple children know, there is no one simple formula for meeting a baby’s needs. From birth, each baby has a unique personality and preferences. Each baby’s nervous system is unique as well. Some babies might be soothed by noise and activity whereas others might prefer calm and quiet. The key is to learn what your baby needs and respond to them accordingly.

Even though all of the sounds and cries may sound the same at first, your baby is communicating with you in different ways, using sound and movement. An arched back, a scrunched-up face, eyes tightly closed, fists curled up, rubbing eyes, hyperactive or frenetic movement—all of these signs communicate something specific about your baby’s emotional and physical state. Your task is to become a “sensory detective” and find out what your baby is communicating and how best to respond.

  • Watch your baby’s facial expressions and body movements for clues about sensory needs. For example, your baby may adjust body position or facial expression, or move his or her arms and legs in response to your voice, or to indicate he’s cold or needs to be held and cuddled.
  • Become familiar with the kinds of sounds your baby makes and what these sounds mean. For example, the "I'm hungry" sound may be a short, low-pitched cry, while the "I'm tired" sound may be a choppy wail.
  • Note the kind of touch your baby enjoys and the amount of pressure that he or she experiences as pleasurable. With almost every touch your newborn is learning about life. The more tender your touch, the more your baby will find the world a comforting place.
  • Pay attention to the kinds of movements, sounds, and environments your baby enjoys. Some babies are comforted by motion, such as rocking or being walked back and forth, while others respond to sounds like soft music, or a change of environment such as being carried outside.

Sometimes babies will be fussy no matter what you do, as when teething, sick, or undergoing a big developmental change. When this happens, keep up your efforts to communicate with and soothe your baby. Your patience, love, and care benefit your baby even if he or she continues to fuss.

Watch out for peer pressure from well-meaning family and friends. What worked for their baby may not work for yours. By learning what it takes to calm and soothe your baby, you initiate trust, and your baby begins the process of learning how to self soothe.

Secure attachment bond tip #2: Eating and sleeping provide important opportunities

Many of your baby’s early signs and signals are about the need for food and proper rest. Increasing the frequency of feedings or adding in some extra time for rest where appropriate can make a big difference in your baby’s ability to engage and interact when awake.

Without proper rest, a baby cannot be calm and alert and ready to engage with you. Babies sleep a lot (often 16-18 hours a day in the first few months), and your baby’s sleep signals will come more often than you might expect. Often, babies who are overtired can act hyper-alert and move frenetically. You might mistake this energy for an invitation to engage, but really, it is your baby’s way of saying that naptime should have been 30 minutes ago.

Hunger will also be the cause of many early cues from your baby. Schedules are helpful, but growth spurts and developmental changes may cause your baby’s needs to change every few weeks so it is helpful to pay close attention to your baby’s unique signs and signals.

Secure attachment bond tip #3: Talk, laugh, and play with your baby

The importance of having fun, playing with, holding, and sharing happiness with your baby cannot be overstated. Smiles, laughter, touch, and interaction are as important to a baby’s development as food or sleep. Your body language, tone of voice, and loving touch are all important ways of communicating with your baby.

When you see signs that your baby wants to play, try to relax and then enjoy exchanging smiles, funny faces, and happy coos with your baby. Toys, books, and music can provide a helpful starting point for play, but often all it takes is a game of peek-a-boo or a silly voice to invite your baby to interact. Infants with an undeveloped nervous system can become exhausted very quickly, so watch for signs that your infant needs to withdraw from play because he or she has become over stimulated. If you feel uncomfortable or unsure about how to play with your baby, keep trying. Any discomfort or embarrassment should go away when you experience the joys of interacting with your child.

Secure attachment bond tip #4: Let go of trying to be the “perfect” parent

You don’t have to be a perfect parent all of the time in order to bond with your baby. Just do your best, and don’t worry if you don’t always know what your baby wants. What makes attachment secure, rather than insecure, is the quality and responsiveness of the interaction with your baby and a willingness to notice and repair a missed signal.

Secure attachment requires you to understand your baby’s cues one third of the time, not every time

You don't have to be perfect to have a secure attachment with your infant. As long as you notice when you have missed your infant’s cue and continue trying to figure out what your baby needs, the secure attachment process stays on track. In fact, the process of realizing there’s a disconnect between you and attempting to repair it may even strengthen the relationship you have with your infant.

Parenting is frequently touted as the hardest job you will ever do. It is amazing how one tiny being can be so much work. But no one is able to be fully present and attentive to an infant 24 hours a day. Every parent needs help and support in order to be relaxed, calm, and engaged.

Secure attachment bond tip #5: Dads can be primary caretakers, too

In households where the mother is the breadwinner and dad stays at home, it is equally important for the father—as the infant's primary caretaker—to connect emotionally with his baby. The kind of multitasking required to care for a baby while simultaneously interconnecting emotionally with the infant can be harder for fathers (information travels more easily across the part of the brain known as the corpus callosum in women, making multitasking of this nature easier). However, with a little more effort, dads can still achieve the same results.

Dads, as the primary caretakers of their baby, can share activities that include:

  • Bottle feeding. Dad can form a special bond with his infant when handling feedings and diaper changes by looking into his baby’s eyes, smiling, and talking.
  • Talking, reading, or singing to your baby. Even though your baby doesn't understand what you're saying, hearing dad’s calm, reassuring voice conveys safety.
  • Playing peek-a-boo and mirroring your baby's movements.
  • Mimicking your baby's cooing and other vocalizations.
  • Holding and touching your baby as much as possible. Fathers can keep baby close by using a front baby carrier, pouch, or sling during daily activities.
  • Letting baby feel the different textures of dad's face.

Challenges to creating a secure attachment bond with your baby

Ideally, a secure attachment bond develops without a hitch. But if either you or your baby is dealing with a problem that interferes with your ability to relax and focus on one another, a secure attachment bond can be delayed or interrupted.

Challenges in babies that can affect secure attachment

Most babies are born ready to connect to their caregivers, but sometimes babies have problems that get in the way of secure attachment. These include:

  • Babies with compromised nervous systems
  • Babies who experienced problems in the womb or in delivery
  • Babies with health problems at birth or at a very early age
  • Premature babies who spent time in intensive care
  • Babies who were separated from their primary caretakers at birth
  • Babies who have experienced a series of caretakers

The sooner more challenging problems are identified, the easier they are to correct. For help, you can turn to your pediatrician, an infant mental health specialist, or someone trained in early intervention.

Challenges in parents that can affect secure attachment

Parents who themselves did not experience a secure attachment bond when they were infants may have trouble emotionally connecting with their babies. Other challenges that can get in the way of your ability to bond with your baby include:

  • Depression, anxiety, or other emotional problems
  • Drug or alcohol problems
  • High levels of stress (from financial problems, lack of support, overwork, etc.)
  • An abusive, neglected, or chaotic childhood history
  • Living in an unsafe environment
  • Mainly negative memories of your own childhood experiences

More help for building a secure attachment bond with your baby

Resources and references

General information on bonding for secure attachment

Bonding with your Baby – Discusses why bonding is important, how your baby interacts, ways to get support and involving other caregivers. (Kids Health)

Attachment: The First Core Strength – Provides a detailed description of the attachment bond and what you can do to promote secure attachment. (Scholastic.com)

Bonding with Your Baby – One sheet about bonding and attachment with good list of suggestions for new mothers. (Child Welfare Department)

Hallmark Developmental Milestones – Detailed list about developmental milestones that relate to bonding. (First Signs)

Parenting advice for building a secure attachment bond with your baby

Learning, Play and Your Newborn - Play is the chief way that infants learn how to move, communicate, socialize, and understand their surroundings. (Kids Health)

Communication and your newborn – Learn how newborns communicate and what to do if you suspect a problem. (Kids Health)

Parent tip sheet: Bonding with your baby – Reviews the importance of bonding, what you might be seeing in a newborn and how to respond. (Child Welfare Information Gallery)

Attachment Parenting International – A website that provides information about secure attachment through education, support, advocacy, and research. (Attachment Parenting International)

Authors: Lawrence Robinson, Joanna Saisan, M.S.W., Melinda Smith, M.A., and Jeanne Segal, Ph.D. Last updated: February 2015.

source: http://www.helpguide.org/articles/secure-attachment/how-to-build-a-secure-attachment-bond-with-your-baby.htm

Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

Dangers of “Crying It Out”

Damaging children and their relationships for the longterm. Post published by Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on Dec 11, 2011 in Moral Landscapes

*See note on basic assumptions below.

Letting babies "cry it out" is an idea that has been around since at least the 1880s when the field of medicine was in a hullaballoo about germs and transmitting infection and so took to the notion that babies should rarely be touched (see Blum, 2002 (link is external), for a great review of this time period and attitudes towards childrearing).

In the 20th century, behaviorist John Watson (1928), interested in making psychology a hard science, took up the crusade against affection as president of the American Psychological Association. He applied the mechanistic paradigm of behaviorism to child rearing, warning about the dangers of too much mother love. The 20th century was the time when "men of science" were assumed to know better than mothers, grandmothers and families about how to raise a child. Too much kindness to a baby would result in a whiney, dependent, failed human being. Funny how "the experts" got away with this with no evidence to back it up! Instead there is evidence all around (then and now) showing the opposite to be true!

A government pamphlet from the time recommended that "mothering meant holding the baby quietly, in tranquility-inducing positions" and that "the mother should stop immediately if her arms feel tired" because "the baby is never to inconvenience the adult."  A baby older than six months "should be taught to sit silently in the crib; otherwise, he might need to be constantly watched and entertained by the mother, a serious waste of time." (See Blum, 2002.)

Don't these attitudes sound familiar? A parent reported to me recently that he was encouraged to let his baby cry herself to sleep so he "could get his life back." 

[Note: In other posts on infant sleep listed below, my co-authors and I point out flaws in studies of sleep training. Here is another example. Check out this article (link is external) and its table that lists the studies reviewed. The table shows that every study is flawed--either the intervention was not followed (fidelity) and/or only parent reports were used, not observation. Moreover, the age range of the children varied. Most importantly, note that most studies did not measure child wellbeing. So there is no responsible way to draw generalizable conclusions from this set of flawed studies. The standards for publishing such studies appears to be very low. In a forthcoming post, we note how many studies use an "Intent to Treat" criterion for distinguishing conditions, not bothering about what actually happened.]

With neuroscience, we can confirm what our ancestors took for granted---that letting babies get distressed is a practice that can damage children and their relational capacities in many ways for the long term. We know now that leaving babies to cry is a good way to make a less intelligent, less healthy but more anxious, uncooperative and alienated persons who can pass the same or worse traits on to the next generation. 

The discredited behaviorist view sees the baby as an interloper into the life of the parents, an intrusion who must be controlled by various means so the adults can live their lives without too much bother. Perhaps we can excuse this attitude and ignorance because at the time, extended families were being broken up and new parents had to figure out how to deal with babies on their own, an unnatural condition for humanity--we have heretofore raised children in extended families. The parents always shared care with multiple adult relatives.

According to a behaviorist view completely ignorant of human development, the child 'has to be taught to be independent.' We can confirm now that forcing "independence" on a baby leads to greater dependence. Instead, giving babies what they need leads to greater independence later. In anthropological reports of small-band hunter-gatherers, parents took care of every need of babies and young children. Toddlers felt confident enough (and so did their parents) to walk into the bush on their own (see Hunter-Gatherer Childhoods, edited by Hewlett & Lamb, 2005).

Ignorant behaviorists then and now encourage parents to condition the baby to expect needs NOT to be met on demand, whether feeding or comforting.  It's assumed that the adults should 'be in charge' of the relationship.  Certainly this might foster a child that doesn't ask for as much help and attention (potentially withdrawing into depression and going into stasis or even wasting away) but it is more likely to foster a whiney, unhappy, aggressive and/or demanding child, one who has learned that one must scream to get needs met. A deep sense of insecurity is likely to stay with them the rest of life.

The fact is that caregivers who habitually respond to the needs of the baby before the baby gets distressed, preventing crying, are more likely to have children who are independent than the opposite (e.g., Stein & Newcomb, 1994). Soothing care is best from the outset. Once patterns of distress get established, it's much harder to change them.

Rats are often used to study how mammalian brains work and many effects are similar in human brains. In studies of rats with high or low nurturing mothers, there is a critical period for turning on genes that control anxiety for the rest of life. If in the first 10 days of life you have a low nurturing rat mother (the equivalent of the first 6 months of life in a human), the gene never gets turned on and the rat is anxious towards new situations for the rest of its life, unless drugs are administered to alleviate the anxiety. These researchers say that there are hundreds of genes affected by nurturance. Similar mechanisms are found in human brains--caregiver behavior matters for turning genes on and off. (See work of Michael Meaney and colleagues; e. g., Meaney, 2001).

We should understand the mother and child as a mutually responsive dyad. They are a symbiotic unit that make each other healthier and happier in mutual responsiveness. This expands to other caregivers too.

One strangely popular notion still around today is to let babies 'cry it out' (aka total extinction or unmodified extinction) when they are left alone, isolated in cribs or in other devices.  This comes from a misunderstanding of child brain development.

Babies grow from being held. Their bodies get dysregulated when they are physically separated from caregivers. (See here for more.)
Babies indicate a need through gesture and eventually, if necessary, through crying. Just as adults reach for liquid when thirsty, children search for what they need in the moment. Just as adults become calm once the need is met, so do babies.
There are many longterm effects of undercare or need-neglect in babies (e.g., Bremmer et al, 1998; Blunt Bugental et al., 2003; Dawson et al., 2000; Heim et al 2003).
Secure attachment is related to responsive parenting, such as comforting babies when they wake up and cry at night (link is external).
What does 'crying it out' actually do to the baby and to the dyad?

Neuronal interconnections are damaged. When the baby is greatly distressed,it creates conditions for damge to synapses, the network construction which is ongoing in the infant brain.  The hormone cortisol is released. In excess, it's a neuron killer but its consequences many not be apparent immediately (Thomas et al. 2007). A full-term baby (40-42 weeks), with only 25% of its brain developed, is undergoing rapid brain growth. The brain grows on average three times as large by the end of the first year (and head size growth in the first year is a sign of intelligence, e.g., Gale et al., 2006). Who knows what neurons are not being connected or being wiped out during times of extreme stress? What deficits might show up years later from such regular distressful experience? (See my addendum below.)

Disordered stress reactivity can be established as a pattern for life not only in the brain with the stress response system (Bremmer et al, 1998), but also in the body through the vagus nerve, a nerve that affects functioning in multiple systems (e.g., digestion). For example, prolonged distress in early life, lack of responsive parenting, can result in a poorly functioning vagus nerve, which is related to various disorders as irritable bowel syndrome (Stam et al, 1997). See more about how early stress is toxic for lifelong health from the recent Harvard report, The Foundations of Lifelong Health are Built in Early Childhood (link is external)).

Self-regulation is undermined. The baby is absolutely dependent on caregivers for learning how to self-regulate. Responsive care---meeting the baby's needs before he gets distressed---tunes the body and brain up for calmness. When a baby gets scared and a parent holds and comforts him, the baby builds expectations for soothing, which get integrated into the ability to self comfort. Babies don't self-comfort in isolation. If they are left to cry alone, they learn to shut down in face of extensive distress--stop growing, stop feeling, stop trusting (Henry & Wang, 1998).

Trust is undermined. As Erik Erikson (link is external) pointed out, the first year of life is a sensitive period for establishing a sense of trust in the world, the world of caregiver and the world of self.  When a baby's needs are met without distress, the child learns that the world is a trustworthy place, that relationships are supportive, and that the self is a positive entity that can get its needs met. When a baby's needs are dismissed or ignored, the child develops a sense of mistrust of relationships and the world. And self-confidence is undermined. The child may spend a lifetime trying to fill the resulting inner emptiness.

Caregiver sensitivity may be harmed. A caregiver who learns to ignore baby crying, will likely learn to ignore the more subtle signaling of the child's needs. Second-guessing intuitions that guide one to want to stop child distress, the adult who learns to ignores baby needs practices and increasingly learns to "harden the heart." The reciprocity between caregiver and baby is broken by the adult, but cannot be repaired by the young child. The baby is helpless.

Caregiver responsiveness (link is external) to the needs of the baby is related to most if not all positive child outcomes. In our work caregiver responsiveness is related to intelligence, empathy, lack of aggression or depression, self-regulation, social competence.  Because responsiveness is so powerful, we have to control for it in our studies of other parenting practices and child outcomes. The importance of caregiver responsiveness is common knowledge in developmental psychology.  Lack of responsiveness, which "crying it out" represents can result in the opposite of the aforementioned positive outcomes.

The 'cry it out' approach seems to have arisen as a solution to the dissolution of extended family life in the 20th century. The vast knowledge of (now great great) grandmothers was lost in the distance between households with children and those with the experience and expertise about how to raise them well. The wisdom of keeping babies happy was lost between generations.

But isn't it normal for babies to cry?

No. A crying baby in our ancestral environment would have signaled predators to tasty morsels. So our evolved parenting practices alleviated baby distress and precluded crying except in emergencies. Babies are built to expect the equivalent of an "external womb" after birth (see Allan Schore (link is external), specific references below). What is the external womb? ---being held constantly, breastfed on demand, needs met quickly (I have numerous posts on these things). These practices are known to facilitate good brain and body development (discussed with references in other posts, some links below). When babies display discomfort, it signals that a need is not getting met, a need of their rapidly growing systems.

source: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/moral-landscapes/201112/dangers-crying-it-out

Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

Self-Regulation: The Second Core Strength

By Bruce Duncan Perry, M.D., Ph.D.

The ability to self-regulate is the second of six core strengths that are an essential part of healthy emotional development. These core strengths are the foundation of Scholastic's company-wide program, Keep the Cool in School: A Scholastic Campaign Against Violence and Verbal Abuse. In this article, Bruce D. Perry, M.D., Ph.D., explores self-regulation and how it contributes to preventing aggression and anti-social behaviors in children.

Self Regulation The Second Core Strength

"Mine! Mine!" The 4-year-old yelled, stamped his feet, grabbed at the toy, pushed his classmate, and finally collapsed to the floor sobbing and inconsolable. This was his third "tantrum" in the last two days.

A just-fed newborn, rocking in the arms of her loving parent, is warm, full, calm, and safe. Her needs are met-for now. But soon, her body will use all of the food, her mother will put her down, and a loud bang will startle her. When this happens, her body tells her-I'm hungry, alone, and in danger. She feels distress and also feels unable to regulate herself. So dependent, her only response is to cry out, hoping that a responsive adult will come to protect and feed her.

Again and again, attentive teachers respond to the needs of the dependent child. When infants and children are incapable of meeting their own needs, they depend upon the external regulation that comes from attentive, caring adults. It is in the context of this loving attention that a special bond grows between the dependent child and the teacher-attachment bonds. A responsive teacher provides the stimulation that helps the child's brain develop the capacity for creating and maintaining healthy emotional relationships.

At the same time, in these same interactions, other crucial areas of the infant's brain are being shaped-the stress-response systems.

Responding to Stress

The brain is continually sensing and responding to the needs of the body. Specialized "thermostats" monitor our internal (for instance, levels of oxygen and sugar in the blood) and external worlds. When they sense something is wrong (that the body is "stressed"), they activate the brain's alarm systems. These stress-response systems then act to help the body get what it needs.

Much of this regulation takes place automatically-beyond our awareness. But as we mature, our brain requires that we actively participate in our own regulation. When the internal world needs food or water or the external world is overwhelming, or threatening, our body "tells" us. If we thirst, we seek water; when afraid, we prepare to fight or flee. In short, we "self-regulate." We act in response to the sensations and feelings that arise from our brain's alarm systems.

When these systems develop normally, we are able to deal with complex and challenging situations with age-appropriate solutions. By adulthood, these should be thoughtful and creative. When a child's capacity for self-regulation does not develop normally, he will be at risk for many problems-from persistent tantrums to impulsive behaviors to difficulty regulating sleep and diet.

What helps the stress-response systems develop in an optimal way is repetitive exposure to controllable "challenges." Every time a child is introduced to something new, a low-level alarm response is activated. But with repetition comes mastery, and what the brain once interpreted as a potential threat is now familiar and tolerable. It is not bad for the child to experience low levels of "anxiety" or distress when he is in a safe and responsive setting. Indeed, when the child gets a little hungry, there is no need to cry because he now knows that that feeling will go away soon ("We have snack time after free play"). Moderate, predictable stress in this responsive, controllable environment leads to resilience. Children become capable of tolerating significant distress. In turn, unpredictable or severe stress can lead to a hyper-reactive stress-response system and a host of problems.

Central to the process of healthy development of stress-response capability is that children learn to read their bodies' signals.

Understanding Body Signals

Many of the sensations we feel when we are "out of regulation" are clear-thirst, for example. But the body tends to use a common set of "alarm" sensations for many different kinds of potential threats. The alarm response and the resulting feelings caused by frustration are very similar to those caused by fear. A fearful child may act sullen and "angry," unaware that they are actually anxious about starting in a new classroom. A hungry child may act distracted, irritable, and noncompliant, again unaware that the internal distress they feel is hunger. We all have had times when we have mislabeled these feelings. Sleep deprivation, illness, physical exhaustion, and family distress are among the things that can activate the alarm response and result in a set of behaviors that are misunderstood by teachers and by the children themselves.

Sometimes, we just can't get what we need right away. We must endure the discomfort related to exhaustion, hunger, thirst, or fear. Learning to tolerate this distress, to correctly label the uncomfortable sensations, and to develop appropriate, mature ways to respond to these signals is central to healthy development. (When you are hungry or tired, you really aren't mad at someone-so you need not act mad. Just remember to eat something between lunch and a late dinner.)

How Self-Regulation Matures

The capacity for self-regulation matures as we grow. Infants are born with an undeveloped capacity to self-regulate. The dehydrated infant can not use words to ask for water nor can he get water. The infant feels thirst, distress and then cries, dependent upon an attuned adult to meet her needs. The transition from external regulation to self-regulation is one of the most important tasks of growing up.

Healthy self-regulation is related to the capacity to tolerate the sensations of distress that accompany an unmet need. The first time the infant felt hunger, she felt discomfort, then distress and then she cried. An attuned adult responded. And after thousands of cycles of hunger, discomfort, distress, response, and satisfaction, the child has learned that this feeling of discomfort, even distress, will soon pass. An adult will come. The attuned, responsive teacher helps the child build in the capacity to put a moment between the impulse and the action.

As young children learn to read and respond appropriately to these inner cues, they become much more capable of tolerating the early signs of discomfort and distress that are related to stress, hunger, fatigue, and frustration. When a child learns to tolerate some anxiety, he will be much less reactive and impulsive. This allows the child to feel more comfortable and act more "mature" when faced with the inevitable emotional, social, and cognitive challenges of development.

With the capacity to put a moment between a feeling and an action, the child can take time to think, plan, and usually come up with an appropriate response to the current challenge. For example, if you want another turn, wait in line and learn to tolerate the frustration of not getting exactly what you want exactly when you want it.

When to Worry

Many children have difficulty with self-regulation. Their stress-response systems are poorly organized and hyper-reactive. This could be related to many factors, including genetic predisposition, developmental insults (such as lack of oxygen in utero), or exposure to chaos, threats, and violence. (Indeed, due to recent events, many children will exhibit difficulties with self-regulation-at least over this next six months). Children with poor self-regulation disrupt an entire classroom. They are often impulsive, hypersensitive to transitions, and tend to overreact to minor challenges or stressors. They may be inattentive or physically hyperactive. These children benefit from the structure, predictability, and enrichment that schools provide. Unfortunately this may not be enough. The degree of attention and nurturing that these children need is often beyond the capacity of a pre-school or kindergarten setting. If these problems are extreme and persistent, or if the behaviors disrupt the class, the child should be referred for further evaluation.

Helping Children Self-Regulate

  • Model self-control and self-regulation in your words and actions when you are frustrated with a classroom situation.
  • Provide structure and predictability. Children with self-regulation problems are internally "unstructured." The more freedom and flexibility they have, the more likely they are to demonstrate uncontrolled behaviors.
  • Anticipate transitions and announce changes in classroom schedules.
  • Reward children with good self-regulation capabilities with freedom and flexibility that will offer them opportunities for spontaneous, creative play and learning.
  • Try to identify the most "reactive" and impulsive children and keep them apart from each other. Pairing children who face these challenges can escalate the problem.
  • Remember that impulsive and aggressive children can create an atmosphere of chaos and fear that inhibit the capacity of other children to learn. Don't be afraid to immediately re-direct inappropriate words and actions. Your actions will make the rest of the children feel safer.
  • Seek help. Don't be afraid to point out a child's self-regulation problems with parents or other school personnel. Early identification and intervention can save the child and family years of failure and pain.

This article originally appeared in Early Childhood Today magazine.



SIDEBAR:

Dr. Bruce D. Perry, M.D., Ph.D., is an internationally recognized authority on brain development and children in crisis. Dr. Perry leads the ChildTrauma Academy, a pioneering center providing service, research and training in the area of child maltreatment (www.ChildTrauma.org). In addition he is the Medical Director for Provincial Programs in Children's Mental Health for Alberta, Canada. Dr. Perry served as consultant on many high-profile incidents involving traumatized children, including the Columbine High School shootings in Littleton, Colorado; the Oklahoma City Bombing; and the Branch Davidian siege. His clinical research and practice focuses on traumatized children-examining the long-term effects of trauma in children, adolescents and adults. Dr. Perry's work has been instrumental in describing how traumatic events in childhood change the biology of the brain. The author of more than 200 journal articles, book chapters, and scientific proceedings and is the recipient of a variety of professional awards. 

Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

Co-Sleeping and Bed-Sharing are Not the Same Thing

When I work with parents believe it or not most of them say that they want to co-sleep at least for the first few months, while the baby is still requiring very frequent night feedings. They are not sure how to go about it safely. I ask them, “Do you mean co-sleep or bed-share?” A lot of the time I get the same response, “Is there a difference?” My answer is, “Yes”.

Are co-sleeping and bed-sharing the same thing?

Technically co-sleeping is any sort of family sleeping room, also called rooming-in with baby. “Rooming in”, typically this term means that the mother and baby stay in the same room during their hospital stay. It also means having your baby sleep in your bedroom, yet they are sleeping in their own bed, crib, playpen, co-sleeper, mat, bassinet etc.

Bed-sharing is a specific type of co-sleeping. As the name implies, it is sharing a bed with the child. If a parent says to me, “I think I want to bed-share with my infant. What do you suggest?” I often ask, “Would you consider a side-car?”

Why use a side-car instead of bed-sharing?

A side-car is a hybrid setup: more than general co-sleeping but not quite true bed-sharing. A lot of parents do not feel safe sharing a bed with their newborn.  A lot of times they opt to have their newborn in a crib next to them. Although I do not advise parents to bed-share, I have no qualms about bed-sharing as long as the parents have done the research and know the rules of bed-sharing from birth.

Why use a side-car instead of a co-sleeper or a bassinet?

Bed-sharing can be daunting. A lot of new parents put a portable crib in their bedroom, or they opt for a dedicated co-sleeper. Both of these options could be the solution you’re looking for, but keep in mind that baby will outgrow them sooner rather than later.

A lot of parents do not want (or cannot afford) to buy baby furniture that will only be used for a few months. A lot of families now a day, opt to attach their child’s crib to a side of their bed. This is commonly called “side-carring”.

Why do some parents choose to co-sleep?

New parents worry about the dangers of SIDS. I have done research and have found that having the baby in the room with the parents of siblings for the first months of life helps the baby lean to regulate their breathing and has shown to decreases the rick of SIDS.

For more in-depth and step-by-step instructions on how to assemble a side-car crib, visit the following links:

http://www.freewebs.com/sidecarcrib/

http://naturalparentsnetwork.com/how-to-side-car-your-crib/

http://www.drmomma.org/2010/01/turn-your-crib-into-cosleeper.html

Webinar: Sleep Shaping Workshop

Webinar: Sleep Shaping Workshop

(for expectant parents and parents with children 0-to-6 months of age)
with Rebecca Kammerer, Pediatric Sleep Coach

Thursday, April 23, 2015 from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM (EDT)    l    $50 per person

At this hour long workshop you will:

- Learn how much sleep your newborn need.

- Learn gentle sleep and soothing tips for your baby

- Review a babies daily schedule based on a child's age.

- Learn a few sleep “shaping” strategies so you never have to sleep train your baby.

At the end you will be sent by email with the following docs and pdfs for your to reffrence:

- Newborn and Sleep

- Gentle Sleep and Soothing Tips for your Baby

- Example of a daily Sleep, Eating and Activity Schedule (aka S.E.A schedules)
-2 Hour Schedule
-3 Hour Schedule
-4 Hour Schedule
-4 Hour Sleeping through the night

Once you have sign-up up you will be sent details on how to join the WebEx webinar.

This webinar is interactive. You will follow along with a power point presentation as Rebecca explains how to go about sleep shaping. Questions can be presented live at the end of the call.

Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

Extinction Style of Sleep Training

What does this method entail?

This one's pretty simple, after placing baby in his crib awake, he is allowed to self-soothe for as long as it takes without parental intervention. This would be the stereotypical 'cry-it-out' and definitely isn't for every family. Depending on the age of your child, you may choose to have designated feeding times at night, so that you aren't simply shutting the door until morning. Even though this method may involve the most initial tears, it actually results in less crying overall since it works the quickest, but it can be stressful for families and difficult to follow-through with.

Who is this method for?

This method may be a 'last resort' for a lot of families who have tried everything else without results. Some children simply become too riled up with the checks, while other parents are just looking for the quickest path to better sleep. This method is straight-forward and no-nonsense but is definitely not necessarily the best method for families. I wouldn't recommend using this method on a baby younger than 6 to 9 months of age, with the guidance of your child's pediatrician..

How long does this method take?

Since this method is the most 'direct' it will work the quickest, usually in 1-3 nights. If it takes much longer than that, that is an indication that baby's schedule may be off (i.e. overtired or undertired), that you are still feeding too close to sleep time, or that this method is not right for your child.

Please note that I do not necessarily endorse this method of sleep coaching, this is just meant to be a helpful description of a popular sleep coaching method.

Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

Modified Controlled Comforting Style of Sleep Training

What does this method entail?

Also called 'Graduated Extinction', this method is very similar to Controlled Comforting, except that you would only complete a few checks, and none thereafter. The idea is that the constant checks may be too stimulating, so by completing a few, you are still letting know baby you are there for them, but not continually intervening, perhaps prolonging the process.

Who is this method for?

This method might be a good fit for a family who has tried Controlled Comforting without success. Or for a child who seems to get riled up by the checks, but parents still want to complete a few to reassure the baby (and themselves). I would only recommend this method for a baby who is 6 months or older, with guidance from your child's pediatrician.

How long does this method take?

Since this method involves even less parental intervention than the last, it would work quicker, likely in 5 nights or less.

Please note that I do not necessarily endorse this method of sleep coaching, this is just meant to be a helpful description of a popular sleep coaching method.

Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

Pick-up/Put Down Technique Style of Sleep Training

What does this method entail?

As with all methods, after your bedtime routine you will put baby down wide awake and walk out. You may choose to set intervals of when you will check on baby or to make it even gentler, you will do the checks whenever baby's crying has reached a certain level of intensity. During the checks, you can go to baby, pick them up until they are calm + 1-2 minutes to further relax them, and put them down still awake. You would repeat the Pick-up/Put Downs until your child is asleep.

Who is this method for?

This method works beautifully on babies under the age of 6 months. It is gentle enough that baby is not being left alone for extended periods of time and you are able to help calm them if they are particularly worked up, but still allows them to self-soothe without you present. While this method works great for young babies, it may be too stimulating and confusing for older babies/children.

How long does this method take?

As always, it depends on the baby, but for a young baby using this method, progress will be seen in about a week's time. For an older baby, it may take longer than that, up to 1.5-2 weeks.

Please note that I do not necessarily endorse this method of sleep coaching, this is just meant to be a helpful description of a popular sleep coaching method.

Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

Shuffle Technique of Sleep Training

What does this method entail?

Put baby in down in crib drowsy but awake and stay by them..  Sit next to baby and offer words of encouragement, hold hand, belly rub, pat intermittently etc. Do not pick baby up unless they are getting to a hysterical point of crying. You may hold your baby to comfort him while standing next to the crib. Do not sit, rock, walk or leave the room. Once your baby is calm lie him down, sit in your chair and start patting and shushing. You stay in the room until the child is asleep and return to the chair if baby wakes up throughout the night (and it's not a designated feeding time).

Over a period of every two days or so move your chair further away from you child's crib. An example is two days beside the crib, two days in the middle of the room, two days inside the bedroom door, two days outside the bedroom door with the door slightly open. You are doing this while you are using less and less verbal comforting. eventually you will put your baby in his crib and falling asleep without you in the room.

Who is this method for?

This method is for babies who are 6 to 9 months, that have gotten the go-head from the child's pediatrician. This method, although it will almost certainly involve some crying, is labelled a 'no cry' method, or gentle sleep mehtod because of the level of parental intervention. You are there for baby every step of the way and aren't leaving them alone to 'cry it out'. While this method is 'gentle', it can be very difficult on the parents. It is hard to sit in your child's room and watch them cry while trying not to engage with them too much. As well, for children who are not used to having mom and dad nearby (i.e. children who were not previously co-sleeping), the presence of their parents may be more stimulating than comforting. That being said, this method is a great choice for parents who are trying to move baby to their own bed, and it also works well for toddlers who are used to having mom or dad lay with them until they are asleep.

How long does this method take?

The gentler the method, the longer it takes. Since this is on the gentler side, it can take up to 2 weeks to see full results. But of course, every child is different.

Please note that I do not necessarily endorse this method of sleep coaching, this is just meant to be a helpful description of a popular sleep coaching method.

Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

Baby Sleep Problems Guide: Scientific Evidence

How can you be sure that our guide to solving baby sleep problems works? Because it’s based on scientific research. This article explains the evidence.

Solving baby sleep problems: the evidence

The strategies recommended in our guide for solving baby sleep problems are based on scientific evidence of what works in solving infant sleeping and settling problems. In addition, the strategies presented in the guide have been specifically evaluated in Australian research. Here we describe this research and its findings.

Sleep problems and postnatal depression

Sleep problems in babies and postnatal depression in parents are common experiences in Australian families. Recent research reveals that 38% of parents believe that their four-week-old baby has a sleep problem. Approximately 13% of women and 10% of men experience postnatal depression in the 12 months following the birth of their baby.

Both problems can have serious consequences for families and adversely affect child development.

There also appears to be a link between baby sleep problems and depression in mothers, but research is yet to work out what is causing what. Does maternal depression affect how babies sleep? Does disrupted sleep cause depression in mothers? Or is it simply that depressed mothers notice or report more sleep problems than non-depressed mothers?

Research has yet to look at the issue of depression in fathers and sleep problems in babies.

Could a simple sleep plan help babies and mothers?

If baby sleep problems and maternal depression are associated, it’s possible that helping parents resolve sleep problems might also have a positive effect on a mother’s mood and well-being.

Dr Harriet Hiscock and Dr Jordana Bayer, researchers from the Center for Community Child Health (Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne) decided to research this question. They wanted to find out whether simple behavior strategies – controlled comforting and camping out – would be effective in reducing both sleep problems in babies and symptoms of depression in mothers.

The study

A total of 328 mothers took part in the research. All mothers were reporting significant sleep problems with their babies at seven months of age. 

Some of these mothers were randomly allocated to a program (treatment group) where they received consultations from a child and family health nurse. The nurse helped the mothers develop an individualized sleep management plan. The plan involved positive bedtime routines, controlled comforting or camping out, and strategies for phasing out night-time feeds and dependence on dummies.

The other mothers (control group) didn’t receive the program – instead, they received an information sheet on normal childhood sleep.

Sleep diaries kept by the mothers and a postnatal depression questionnaire were used to assess the effects of the program.

What did the study find?

When infants were 10, 12 and 24 months old, all mothers were asked about their child’s sleep and their own mood. Here is a summary of what the researchers found:

  • The program was effective in helping parents resolve infant sleep problems. Sleep problems were resolved for more participants in the treatment group than in the control group and those sleep problems that remained in the treatment group were less severe. These findings were maintained at two years.
  • The intervention was also effective in reducing depression symptoms overall. These results were maintained at two years, with mothers in the treatment group less likely to report high levels of depression compared to mothers in the control group.
  • The results were best for mothers who entered the study with higher levels of depression. They reported greater improvements in their baby’s sleep problems and greater reductions in their depression symptoms than mothers in the control group.
  • In other findings, the program was found to be acceptable to mothers and reduced the need for other help from professionals.

What can we conclude?

This research is consistent with previous research that has found simple behavior strategies to be effective in addressing sleeping problems in young children. The results also suggest there might be real benefits for the health and well-being of mothers when infant sleep problems are effectively addressed.

Study follow-up

The researchers decided to find out how the families who completed the program were going when their children were 3-4 years old. Most sleeping problems had been resolved (including those in the control group). But nearly one in five problems had returned. The researchers speculated that parents might have been reporting sleeping difficulties caused by other reasons now that the children were older. 

The good news was that regardless of whether there were sleep difficulties, all families were functioning well.

source raising children network

Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

Positive Bedtime Routines

Bedtime battles can be less of a problem when you use a positive routine in the 20 minutes before tucking young children in for the night.

A positive routine involves your child going through a few pleasurable activities in the crucial 20-minute period before bedtime. It helps soothe and calm your child to get ready for sleep.

A good bedtime routine smoothes the way for good sleeping habits. Without a good routine, it can be hard for a baby to settle to sleep.

What a positive bedtime routine looks like

A routine can have any number of activities. Most routines involve a mix of pre-bed tasks (bath, brushing teeth) and quiet, enjoyable activities (reading a story). The aim is to keep the atmosphere positive, using positive attention and praise. The key is that similar activities are done in roughly the same way each night.

Here’s an example of a routine that can start after dinner and a bath:

  • breastfeed or bottle-feed (outside the bedroom)
  • quiet play for 15-20 minutes (can include reading a book together)
  • going into the bedroom
  • brief cuddle and kiss
  • into bed.

At the end of the 20-minute ‘positive period’, say goodnight. This is the time to be firm if your child resists. Be clear that it’s now time for sleep, then leave the room promptly.

Making a start: choosing the best bedtime

You might have an ideal bedtime in mind – somewhere between 7 pm and 8 pm for young children.

But when you’re dealing with settling problems, the best bedtime to start with is one closest to when your child naturally falls asleep. For example, if you find that your child finally falls asleep around 9 pm, set this as a temporary bedtime.

This increases the chance that the routine will become firmly associated with the onset of sleep.

Moving your child’s actual bedtime towards your ideal bedtime

The final step of the positive routine involves bringing your child’s bedtime forward. This begins a week after introducing the ‘positive period’ and involves making bedtime 5-10 minutes earlier every few days. You do this until you reach your child’s ideal bedtime.

For example, if your child has been falling asleep at 9 pm, but you want an 8 pm bedtime:

  1. Start by putting your child to bed at 8.50 pm.
  2. Do this for several nights.
  3. Move bedtime back to 8.40 pm for the next few nights.
  4. Continue this gradual ‘fading’ process until your child is going to bed at the right time.

How long it takes

The routine usually takes a few weeks to be effective. But how quickly the ‘positive period’ can be successfully shortened each week will have a big impact on how long it will take for this process to work.

Typically, the ‘positive period’ needs to be shortened gradually, rather than quickly.

source Raising Children.net.au

Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

Controlled Comforting Technique of Sleep Training

You can solve baby sleep problems with controlled comforting. It involves comforting, settling and walking away so your baby learns to go to sleep without you. Here’s how to do it.


What is controlled comforting?

Controlled comforting is a behavior management strategy for dealing with persistent settling and waking problems in young children.

The idea behind controlled comforting is to help children learn how to settle themselves to sleep, rather than you feeding, patting or cuddling them to sleep.

Controlled comforting involves quickly checking and reassuring your baby while he is learning to settle.

Is controlled comforting harmful? 
Despite concerns about potential harms to the baby, no studies published in peer-reviewed journals have shown any psychological or physical harm from using controlled comforting (or other behaviour management techniques described on this site). 

In fact, recent research has shown that babies who have undergone controlled comforting are more likely to sleep better in the short term, and are as well adjusted as their peers in terms of behaviour and sleep in the long term. A recent study also found that parents who used these techniques with their babies reported fewer symptoms of depression in both the short and long term than parents who didn’t.
Before you start with controlled comforting

Parents dealing with sleep and settling problems can become very tired and stressed, particularly if they’re losing sleep themselves. Controlled comforting is sometimes tried by parents who feel overwhelmed, or whose wellbeing is suffering.

You should use controlled comforting only:

with babies older than six months and less than two years
as part of a total program for establishing healthy sleep patterns that includes a positive bedtime routine
when you’re confident your baby is getting lots of attention, time and affection during the day.

How to do controlled comforting

  1. Establish a consistent and positive bedtime routine.
  2. When it’s time to say goodnight, put your baby in his cot and tuck him in. Either talk to and/or pat your baby until he’s quiet, or for one minute.
  3. As soon as your baby is quiet, or after one minute, say goodnight and leave the room. Leave before your baby is asleep.
  4. Stay out of the bedroom and give your baby a chance to settle by herself. Ignore grizzling.
  5. If your baby starts to really cry, wait for the set amount of time before going back to your baby – for example, two minutes at first.
  6. Leave your baby for a sequence of set time intervals – for example, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 minutes, or 5, 10 and 15 minutes. Set your own intervals of time based on how long you think you can manage.
  7. After each time interval has passed, return briefly to your baby if he’s still crying. Talk to your baby or pat him for one minute, or continue talking or patting until he’s quiet (depending on your preference). Try to soothe him without picking him up if you can.
  8. Keep an eye on her nappy. If it’s dirty, change her under low light and with minimal fuss.
  9. As soon as he’s quiet (or after one minute), but before he’s asleep, leave the room again and wait for the next set time interval. You’re trying to give your baby the opportunity to learn to go to sleep by himself. He is also learning that you are not far away and do eventually return.
  10. This process is continued until your baby falls asleep by herself.
  11. When your baby wakes overnight, follow the same routine.

Important tips for controlled comforting

  • Controlled comforting takes 3-14 days to work.
  • Use a clock or your mobile phone to time intervals – four minutes can seem like a very long time.
  • Turn baby monitors down or off. Make sure you can still hear your baby.
  • Don’t wait outside your baby’s bedroom. Go into another room and distract yourself, perhaps making a cup of tea and turning on the TV. Only go back to check on your baby when the set time is up.
  • Talk to your partner first to make sure that you both agree with what’s going on. Work out what role each of you will play – for example, helping with resettling or timing the intervals. Consider taking turns each night.
  • Avoid important commitments for the first few days after you start controlled comforting. You need to be able to see it through without a major change to your baby’s routine.
  • Remember to leave your baby’s room before he falls asleep.

source Raising Children.net.au

Please note that I do not necessarily endorse this method of sleep coaching, this is just meant to be a helpful description of a popular sleep coaching method.

Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

Taylor Swift - "Blank Space" PARODY (Mom Version)

Produced by   WhatsUpMoms  

Produced by   WhatsUpMoms

 


This is for all the Sleep Deprived Mommies (and Daddies).

Click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6FrBS2pPcak

 

 

 

Camping Out Sleep Technique of Sleep Training

Camping out is a gradual and gentle technique to help children over six months of age learn to fall asleep by themselves.

What is camping out?

Camping out is a strategy for dealing with persistent settling and waking problems in babies and young children. It can also be helpful with older children who are having problems getting to sleep, particularly if they feel anxious or frightened.

The idea behind camping out is to help children learn how to settle themselves to sleep, rather than you feeding, patting or cuddling them to sleep. 

Steps for camping out

  1. Place a bed or chair next to your baby’s cot.
  2. Lie or sit next to your baby and pat or stroke baby off to sleep.
  3. When your baby is asleep, you can leave the room.
  4. When your baby is used to falling asleep like this (usually three nights), sit or lie by the bed until baby falls asleep. Don’t touch baby.
  5. When your baby is used to falling asleep like this (usually another three nights), move your chair or bed away from the cot a short distance (30-40 cm). Stay in the chair or bed until your baby falls asleep.
  6. Move your bed or chair gradually towards the doorway and out of baby’s room. This could take a period of 1-3 weeks.
  7. If your baby wakes overnight, return to the chair or bed (at the point you are up to with settling). Stay there until baby goes back to sleep.

Important tips for camping out

  • When sitting or lying next to your baby, keep things quiet. Do not talk to or play with baby.
  • Try to avoid making eye contact while you’re settling baby. This tells your baby that play time has finished. It might help to close your own eyes while sitting beside your baby.
  • Some babies can get very angry that parents aren’t picking them up – but resist the temptation to pick your baby up. If you do, you run the risk of reinforcing this habit. Your baby will eventually learn that you are there for comfort, but not for picking up.
  • When trying any new settling strategy, consistency is the key. The more consistent you are, the faster your baby will learn to fall asleep.

If things haven’t improved after two weeks, talk to your doctor or child and family health nurse. They’ll be able to help you develop a program tailored to the needs of your child.

source Raising Children.net.au

Please note that I do not necessarily endorse this method of sleep coaching, this is just meant to be a helpful description of a popular sleep coaching method.

Sleep Cadets Inc. - 917-862-7644 - sleepcadets@gmail.com - www.sleepcadets.com ----------MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER The Author provides the Site and the services, information, content and/or data (collectively, “Information”) contained therein for informational purposes only. The Author does not provide any medical advice on the Site, and the Information should not be so construed or used. You hereby agree that you shall not make any health or medical related decision based in whole or in part on anything contained in the Site.

"Speaking"...of Sleep

Want Rebecca to speak at your next event?

 

Areas of Expertise

 

#1 Rebecca’s own sleep story

Growing-up in a dysfunctional home, Rebecca never knew what a good night’s sleep looked like as a child. Using the shear intuitive strength of insight, Rebecca knew there was a more loving way to live. Along her early adult experiences Rebecca was very fortunate to have been lead to some truly amazing people to learn what loving and happy home’s looked like. She was able to hone much of her innate understanding of how creating a loving bedtime routine would lead a child to feel more love and a heartfelt connection to one’s caregiver. Rebecca had the wonderful experience of studying with the amazing sleep coach Kim West. Rebecca is known for her no-nonsense wisdom she offers to families through her company Sleep Cadets. Highly motivational and humbly charm, Rebecca’s recipes for sleep success are chock-full of real life lessons. Not to be missed!

 

#2 Ten ways to lead your family to better sleep

Rebecca Kammerer built her company, Sleep Cadets, by working with families that were ready to make a positive difference in their child’s sleep habits. Rebecca shares her best strategies for creating an overall daily schedule to meet your family’s needs, using the right method of sleep coaching for your child and creating a fabulous bedtime routine, for creating an atmosphere of fun and love that breeds a secure attachment, and gives you the tools to pick-up the coaching, even when you have set-backs. Rebecca’s unique and practical lessons will help parents, caregivers, daycares and preschools learn healthy sleep habits.

 

#3 How to create a bedtime routine that will become a family long tradition

Consistency is one of the key components to sleep coaching. A great bedtime routine determines a third of your success. Rebecca Kammerer, founder of Sleep Cadets, shares her diehard advice on how to create a bedtime routine that you can tailor to your child, use yourself, and turn your child’s bedtime into a warm and loving time that they will remember their whole life. Rebecca can help anyone to craft a perfect bedtime routine and how to avoid the most common hang-ups of getting your child to bed. Here’s the inside scoop on bedtime straight from Rebecca!

 

#4 What is sleep coaching really like?

What is sleep coaching really like? At what age can a parent consider sleep coaching? Can a baby that is breastfeeding really be sleep coached? How long is can the process take? Through dozens of personal sleep coaching stories, Rebecca takes you on a journey of some of the wonderful and unique cases she has had the fortune of working with.  Rebecca will share the successful and not-so-successful sleep coaching experiences. You will learn why it worked for some families and on the rare occasion it did not work for others. Rebecca’s warm nature and wisdom will leave you clamoring for more!


Contact Rebecca

Please email to request an interview, book a speaking event, or arrange a private consult. sleepcadets@gmail.com


Rebecca’s Bio

Rebecca Kammerer’s background of work and study has greatly revolved around children, most importantly caring for children. She studied psychology at SUNY Purchase. She owned an in-home daycare and she was a live-in/out nanny for over 14 years. She has been in the pediatric sleep business for five years and recognizes that you are searching for answers. She have been personally trained and certified by "The Sleep Lady", Kim West as a Gentle Sleep Coach.

Whether you decide that co-sleeping, room sharing, or having your child in their own crib, bed or on a mat is for your family, Rebecca helps parents learn to obtain this. All the while guiding you on how to create healthy sleep habits for your entire family.

Most recently her studies have been based on “maternal depression and sleep training”. What she has learned is how the attachment process between the primary caregiver, who is going through depression and the child, can be negatively affected by using the cry-it-out method of sleep training, as well as how the baby’s brain can be altered due to prolonged bouts of crying. From this, she has created schedules to help with the overall health of a child. She talks with families of how it is important that the people supporting the depressed parent learn to recognize the signs of maternal depression and encourage them to seek help.

She is located in a pediatrician’s office (Happy and Healthy Pediatrics in Mineola, NY). What is wonderful about this partnership is, even though the practices go-to form of sleep training is the cry-it-out method, they are still open to the concerns of the parent who decide that that method of sleep coaching is not for their family. At which point they refer them to Rebecca.


Testimonials

"... I'm a developmental psychologist and a certified early childhood teacher, ...I don't hesitate to recommend Rebecca to anyone who experiences distress, frustration and worry about their child's sleep habits. Our daughter gained a great deal from the skills Rebecca helped us teach her; however, my husband and I equally benefited from the guidance, support, and encouragement from Rebecca. She taught us to trust our instincts and trust our daughter and what she was trying to communicate, while shutting out the chatter from well-meaning, but uninformed family and friends..."

-Andrea R., New York, N.Y.

 

"we are finally sleeping through the night (12 hours) and taking two scheduled naps for at least an hour and 15 min each! I’m not nursing to sleep anymore and she is not nursing in the middle of the night. We have an awesome routine..."

-Deb, Nick & OF COURSE MIA:), New York

 

"Rebecca Kammerer’s sleep coaching was an incredible support to me while I was sleep training my 15 month old son. Her thoroughness and attentiveness went above and beyond my expectations. It can be very daunting trying to get your child to sleep better, but with Rebecca’s expert guidance the process was smooth and successful. I highly recommend Rebecca’s services. She is a wonderful coach!"

-Lorraine Miller, Gratitude Writer, Speaker + Coach, GratitudeToBliss.com

 

"...After our first conversation, I began to feel that there may be some hope for us in correcting my son's terrible sleep pattern. My husband and I implemented the strategies that Rebecca recommended and were surprised with how fast our son responded. We now have the tools needed to help teach our son to self sooth and to fall asleep without carrying him around and rocking him to sleep..."

-Karen and Michael W., East Northport, N.Y.

 

"...With Rebecca's help, support, advice and guidance, we have found success and feel confident in our ability to help our son sleep well. Our entire family is happier and better rested thanks to Rebecca! She was and continues to be always available to help, and we could not have done this without her."

-Meredith and John Z., Oceanside, N.Y.

 

"...Rebecca is my third (and FINALLY the last) sleep trainer. So, it is safe to say that I am an expert in what to expect/get from sleep trainers out there..."

-Sonila K., Brooklyn, NY

 

"...It is now 3 weeks after starting the program and I am happy to say our daughter has been sleeping from 7:15pm-6:15am. There is no more screaming crying at bedtime or naptime and she successfully takes 3 naps a days."

-Liz V., NY

 

"...I needed help, and all I needed to do was ask for it. After speaking to Dr. Elissa Rubin one day, she recommended calling Rebecca. I sat on it for a while, and then made the call. It was the best thing I did, and I regret not calling her sooner! Rebecca is kind and compassionate and made me feel like I am not alone in the sleep deprived world. She offered me guidance and step by step support to get me through this difficult time..."

-T.C, East Williston, NY

 

"...We are so grateful we called Rebecca and we know Piper is a happier baby now that she is well rested." 

-Amanda M., Garden City, NY

 

"...Not only was Rebecca able to help give me practical ways of getting her to sleep but she also offered suggestions to make improvements overall for both babies. Rebecca’s support was unbelievable..."

-Cathy J., Long Island, NY

 

"...She led us to think about the way we parent, and how we need to alter our style of parenting based on the difference between our daughter's temperaments..."

-Dr. Elissa Rubin, Happy and Healthy Pediatrics

 

"Before meeting Rebecca I thought my kids would never sleep more than 3-4 hours at a time. Using her program and guidance my twins can now sleep from 9 - 11 hours straight. Rebecca was very thorough and attentive to our needs as parents of twins. I am now recommending Rebecca to all my co-workers who have babies."

-Anthony M., Nassau County, NY

 

"...Rebecca was mindful and emphatic to the needs of a breastfeeding mother ..."

-Alison C., Long Island, NY

 

“Any family that is lucky enough to work with Rebecca will value her maturity, competence, exceptional natural abilities, attention to detail, dedication to her work and charming manner. It gave us peace of mind…”

-Barbara Corcoran of ABC's Shark Tank

 

"...Rebecca gave us small assignments every few days that built on previous assignments’ progress so it never felt like we were going too fast for our daughter (or us!). ..."

-Lauren M., Lynbrook, NY

 

"...Within a few hours she had sent me an email summarizing all of the points we discussed ...Rebecca told me that even though it is too early to start formal sleep training; it is not too early to start healthy sleep habits. ...she gave me some good pointers on how to deal with a reflux baby..."

-Michelle M.

 

"...Sometimes just having a nonjudgmental ear was all I needed for the day, other times it was a tweaking of technique. Rebecca provided it all..."

-Ashley M., Long Island, NY